Difference between revisions of "Cornus sericea ssp. sericea"

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:'''History'''<br>
 
:'''History'''<br>
 
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:* Introduced into cultivation in California by Theodore Payne.
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:* From ''California Native Plants'', Theodore Payne's 1941 catalog: "A deciduous shrub with smooth spreading reddish twigs and handsome foliage. The flowers are small, in medium sized clusters, creamy white and very fragrant. The shrub is also desirable for its distinctive foliage which takes on beautiful autumn tints in the fall. Should be planted in a moist spot. Gallon cans, 50c."
  
 
:'''Other Names'''<br>
 
:'''Other Names'''<br>
  
 +
:'''References'''<br>
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:* Bornstein, Carol, David Fross, and Bart O'Brien. ''California Native Plants for the Garden.'' Los Olivos, CA: Cachuma Press. 2005.
  
 
:'''Links'''<br>
 
:'''Links'''<br>

Latest revision as of 16:58, 17 April 2010

Species Name: Cornus sericea ssp. sericea
Common Name: Red-twig Dogwood

Beautiful, spreading shrub. Stunning fall color in colder areas. Best in moist shady areas. Good for erosion control along stream banks.

Plant Family: Cornaceae
Plant Type: Shrub
Height by Width: 15' H x 10' W
Growth Habit: Multi-branched, open and upright
Deciduous/Evergreen: Semi-deciduous
Growth Rate: Fast
Sun Exposure: Part sun to shade
Soil Preference: Adaptable
Water Requirements: Regular
Cold Hardy to: 15 degrees F
Flower Season: Spring- through summer
Flower Color: White
Endangered?: Not listed
Distribution: Throughout California Floristic Province, but uncommon in Southern California
Natural Habitat: Many, generally moist habitats below 8400'

Songbird iconA.jpg Butterfly iconA.jpg Clay iconA.jpg Slope iconA.jpg


Care and Maintenance


History
  • Introduced into cultivation in California by Theodore Payne.
  • From California Native Plants, Theodore Payne's 1941 catalog: "A deciduous shrub with smooth spreading reddish twigs and handsome foliage. The flowers are small, in medium sized clusters, creamy white and very fragrant. The shrub is also desirable for its distinctive foliage which takes on beautiful autumn tints in the fall. Should be planted in a moist spot. Gallon cans, 50c."
Other Names
References
  • Bornstein, Carol, David Fross, and Bart O'Brien. California Native Plants for the Garden. Los Olivos, CA: Cachuma Press. 2005.
Links